Accidents Caused By Unsafe Footpaths

On some housing estates there are a lot of footpaths that connect different parts of the housing estate, such as the medical centre and the local shops.A� Who is legally responsible for repairing and maintaining the footpaths in a safe condition to prevent people suffering accidents whilst walking on the paths?

Mr Gulliksen tripped and fell on a footpath on an estate in Milford Haven when he caught his foot on a manhole cover that was sticking up in the surface of the path.A� The accident happened on a footpath that connected a group of houses to one of the main footpaths on the estate.A�The housing estate was owned by the county council and had been constructed in the 1970a��s by the local authority.A� Mr Gulliksen made an accident compensation claim against the county council for the injury sustained to his arm in the accident.

The county council argued that it was not liable to pay compensation to Mr Gulliksen and the case was therefore decided by the courts.A�The Court of Appeal took the view that the compensation claim was straight forward because the Highways Act, which places a legal duty on councils to maintain public roads and pavements in a safe condition, also applies to footpaths on the older housing estates that were constructed during the 1950a��s, 1960a��s and 1970a��s.A�The council was ordered to pay A?3,000 compensation to Mr Gulliksen for the injury caused to his arm in the accident.

The Court of Appeala��s decision: Gulliksen v Pembrokeshire County Council

Safe Work For Disabled People

About 18% of the population of Great Britain has a disability, suffering a physical or mental impairment, due to, for instance, diabetes, arthritis, asthma, migraines, epilepsy and many other medical conditions.

People with mental or physical impairments should receive equal treatment at work and this includes protection from suffering accidents at work. During the last 25 years most workplace safety laws have originated in the European Union and E U directive 89/654/EEC states that a�?workplaces must be accommodated to take account, where required, of the needs of disabled workers.A�This provision applies in particular to the doors, passageways, staircases, lavatories and workstations used by disabled workersa��.

A risk assessment should be undertaken to examine what may cause an accident or harm to people doing the work and whether the existing safety measures are sufficient.A�A workplace that is safe for people with disabilities is also safe for all employees and the aim of a risk assessment is to make sure that no one gets injured at work.

Companies are required to make reasonable adjustments to workplaces and to tasks at work for disabled people with the aim of disabled people having equal opportunities in staying in work. a�?Reasonable adjustmentsa�� may include time off work for medical treatment and adapting equipment.A� The Government currently provides an Access to Work grant that is aimed at providing money to assist disabled people to do their work and may be used to pay for adaptations to equipment and may pay for transport to work.

The disability employment adviser at the local Jobcentre Plus office will provide detailed advice on financial assistance for disabled people at work.

The Equality Act 2010